/page/2

Blog Entry from my DJ Collective You Don’t Have To Settle

Like many, I first became aware of Pink Floyd in middle school, but college is where my fondness for the band really blossomed. I was a junior, with my first serious boyfriend, and Dark Side of the Moon was the soundtrack to our endless make-out sessions. Over ten years later I still listen to that album, and it sometimes conjures up a glimpse of those old euphoric feelings; the kind of synergistic sensory experience you get from travel, or sex, or sometimes yoga.

Countless albums have paid tribute to Pink Floyd; one of the best being a record that has been on Billboard’s reggae charts since 2003; the Easy Star All-Stars Dub Side of the Moon, which I love. (Full disclosure: I haven’t heard the full 2010 re-work Dubber Side of the Moon, though considering the bass-heavy dub remix of Money from Mad Professor, I bet it’s worth a listen.)

Then there’s the tribute album from Vitamin String Quartet—a savior band for any DJ who has done a wedding; I’ve found their take on Echoes to be quite useful. And continuing on the lighter side is Wish You Were Here from Lia Ices, originally recorded for Mojo Magazine’s Pink Floyd tribute compilation.  Ices’ cover is like the rest of her catalogue; ethereal, breathy, sort of a Feist 2.0 with traces of Kate Bush. Schooled close to home at NYU’s Tisch School, Ices is my latest neo-folk crush, and you know it’s deep because I’d never utter that term lightly.

-Fucci

picplz & charity: water team up for #worldwaterday

charity: water teams up with picplz for #worldwaterday by posting a call to action on their picplz account:



picplz supports promotion through their channels:

from bestofpicplz:

Over 1 Billion people don’t have access to clean drinking water, and yesterday people across the globe reflected on this for World Water Day.

picplz teamed up with charity: water and encouraged you to post photos that express how water plays an integral role in your life.

We have received so many great photos that we’re extending submissions for one more day.



Submissions are entered and reviewed:



The winner’s photo is posted on charity: water’s blog:


Madision Square Garden & picplz team up to give away tickets to the last LCD Soundsystem show in NYC. Users submit black and white photos to win. 

MSG and picplz promote the contest through social media posts:


Submissions are varied and creative:




Winner is selected to receive two tickets to the last show….


…and later shares shots from the show with the picplz community.

Madision Square Garden & picplz team up to give away tickets to the last LCD Soundsystem show in NYC. Users submit black and white photos to win. 



MSG and picplz promote the contest through social media posts:



Submissions are varied and creative:



Winner is selected to receive two tickets to the last show….




…and later shares shots from the show with the picplz community.


TOMS promotion on picplz: #withoutshoes

from bestofpicplz:

On April 5th TOMS Shoes is raising awareness to the millions of children in poverty around the world by asking people to go One Day Without Shoes. As you may already know, TOMS donates a pair of shoes to a child in need for every pair of TOMS shoes sold. Its their One for One mission.

We at picplz want to help TOMS in their amazing charitable efforts by urging you picplzrs to spread awareness on April 5th.

Post a black and white photo to picplz of your bare feet with the caption “#WithoutShoes”.  Don’t be afraid to get creative.

To the user who submits the most compelling and creative bare foot photo on April 5th, picplz will buy you one pair of TOMS shoes (which means a child in need gets a pair too!) and your photo will be featured on best of picplz!

Please join us in spreading awareness of this great cause.



Submissions to the #withoutshoes picplz contest:



Winning Submission:

Willie Mae Rock Camp
Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls is a non-profit music and mentoring program that empowers girls and women through music education, leadership skills, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration.
 
Every summer I volunteer, teaching a week-long DJ course to a small group of young women in this highly interactive, diverse, and experiential environment. I am always amazed to watch their innate creativity and exponentially growing skills; from the first day they are playing records, and at the end of the week they perform their own live set to a crowd of hundreds. 





Photos courtesy of Kate Englebrecht (Thriller), Kate Milford (Devil Horns), Emily August (Blue Tees)

Willie Mae Rock Camp

Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls is a non-profit music and mentoring program that empowers girls and women through music education, leadership skills, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration.

Every summer I volunteer, teaching a week-long DJ course to a small group of young women in this highly interactive, diverse, and experiential environment. I am always amazed to watch their innate creativity and exponentially growing skills; from the first day they are playing records, and at the end of the week they perform their own live set to a crowd of hundreds. 

Photos courtesy of Kate Englebrecht (Thriller), Kate Milford (Devil Horns), Emily August (Blue Tees)

Installation Review: “Preternature”

Art Installation Review by Roseanne Malfucci

Though it was just past noon on a Sunday, I was already worn out when I arrived at a meeting to discuss the cataloguing of Preternature.  It was my third stop of the day, and after wearily greeting Chase and Lenk I promptly excused myself, anxious to rinse off the residue of previous activities.

Upon entering the bathroom I’m immediately taken aback by a colony of shiny turquoise mollusks trekking from the toilet up towards the medicine cabinet. I smiled, remembering the intrigue from when I first learned of Chase’s work. A sensitizing engagement, his creatures simultaneously captivate and repulse; missing links to the hidden ecosystems all around us, drawn with animated vibrance.

Vivid pastels make Chase’s creatures somehow endearing- dissolving your disgust toward hundred-legged insects, you are whisked back to the sandbox, observing marching ants on your hands and knees. Further inquiry becomes amazement when you find that each creature has been reconstituted from our collective refuse. Carnage left in the wake of our modern routines- straws, styrofoam, gum- reduced to a pulp and transformed into the earth’s decomposers. The inert plastics that cornerstone our daily existence living their afterlife as bacteria and molds. 

With regeneration as their primary function, the surroundings of these decomposers are inextricably entwined with the forms themselves. Viewing these forms after return to their origins, we witness an extension of sprawling life energy alongside deliberate rooting to environment. Lenk’s chosen perspectives place each piece with careful subtlety, suggesting the delicate strength of the natural world.  Random tufts of grass peek up from a distant floorboard; molds creep along pipe at the base of a building. Juxtaposed with these are similar emergents, captured imprints of the course of human traffic. Framing grace and chaos through explorations of urban landscape, Lenk infuses synthetic everyday living with the wonder of a discovery walk through the woods.

Loudcrowd

Loudcrowd was Conduit Labs’ (now Zynga Boston) first game- a destination website of clubs and playlists, where users could mingle and interact within a community as they leveled up to unlock dances and abilities. Users would personalize their characters with clothing, accessories, new moves, and songs collected. Loudcrowd revolved around curated music, with daily playlists by myself and guest DJs like Eli Escobar, Brooklyn Vegan and Santigold. As Conduit’s Director of Music Programming I had the opportunity to interview A-trak, produce a video with Chester French, and work with tons of other great independent artists.

Press

Wired

Credits:

Chester French video filmed by Emily Zilm

Roseanne interviews A-trak photo by Winnie Au 

Love Machine
In 2008, me and my NRG DJ partner Brian Blackout were both single, and wanted to do something about it. Love Machine was born as a way to bring upbeat music and (available!) NYC community together in a light-hearted low-pressure way. We worked with tech guru team Publk to install an interactive chat station where party-goers could text or twitter messages to other bar patrons they’d like to get to know. We handed out numbers for guests (including the DJs) to identify themselves, and all messages-personal or anonymous- were projected on the stage.

Love Machine

In 2008, me and my NRG DJ partner Brian Blackout were both single, and wanted to do something about it. Love Machine was born as a way to bring upbeat music and (available!) NYC community together in a light-hearted low-pressure way. We worked with tech guru team Publk to install an interactive chat station where party-goers could text or twitter messages to other bar patrons they’d like to get to know. We handed out numbers for guests (including the DJs) to identify themselves, and all messages-personal or anonymous- were projected on the stage.


Double Vision
In 2007, those that found themselves in NYC Chinatown’s Happy Ending on a Wednesday night may have stumbled into the basement and wondered- who are all these weirdos? Bathed in neon, LED light and strobe, patrons at Love Muscle danced with drag queens, eco-hackers, recovering goths, and tranny tapdancers, all to a proto/post/nu/future disco soundtrack provided by Fucci. Hosts Sequinette and Glenn Marla kept the fun moving while pre-status DJs made guest appearances.
On this particular evening, the theme was Double Vision, a transmorphic party where guests were encouraged to take on their better (or worse) half. Wandering through installations like the Sequinette’s UV Reactive Bubble Lounge and Boylab’s Stereoscopic Image Station, partygoers would try on a range of personalities, with their ultimate transformations projected live on the wall.
 

Double Vision

In 2007, those that found themselves in NYC Chinatown’s Happy Ending on a Wednesday night may have stumbled into the basement and wondered- who are all these weirdos? Bathed in neon, LED light and strobe, patrons at Love Muscle danced with drag queens, eco-hackers, recovering goths, and tranny tapdancers, all to a proto/post/nu/future disco soundtrack provided by Fucci. Hosts Sequinette and Glenn Marla kept the fun moving while pre-status DJs made guest appearances.

On this particular evening, the theme was Double Vision, a transmorphic party where guests were encouraged to take on their better (or worse) half. Wandering through installations like the Sequinette’s UV Reactive Bubble Lounge and Boylab’s Stereoscopic Image Station, partygoers would try on a range of personalities, with their ultimate transformations projected live on the wall.

 

Short Story Excerpt: “Chairwork”

Essay by Roseanne Malfucci

You know the feeling.  You haven’t seen your family for a while and you’ve finally managed to make that trek to their doorstep for the first time in over a year. You reach for the bell, then thoughtfully pause and scan your appearance. This is your thirty-second window to conceal all evidence of the lack of composition in your daily life. 

Imagine going through this exercise on a continual basis. Once a week you make an entrance that sets the subtle, encoded tone for your entire visit and forms a lasting imprint on all interactions to come. You’re probably familiar with this kind of pressure. If not, you’re the only person I know who isn’t currently conducting that secret, serial relationship that dare not speak its name.

Therapy.  

Those few seconds outside the therapist’s door are reserved for self-scrutiny; the time to hide anything that might betray my less-than-together status.  My demeanor overhaul goes like this: Slow down my breathing. Clear my head. Fix my clothes and adjust my baggage.  I will enter this office with a graceful poise that masks the many issues requiring me to return for a weekly fee of $125.

Blog Entry: LCD Soundsystem

Blog Entry by Roseanne Malfucci

I was so excited when my DJ partner Brian Blackout landed us some tickets to LCD Soundsystem’s recently added fourth show at NYC’s Terminal Five. I was late in the game to realize how completely amazing the latest record was (after its release I spent a few disinterested weeks before getting around to listening to it, thanks to my underground/outsider “it’s just getting too much hype” residual self-image). Plus I had my associations- hearing them play at opening night of London’s now-defunct The Key and being turned off by their infamous decibel level, or feeling ruffled by the harsh urgency of their mid 00s disco-punky singles (Get Innocuous/Daft Punk Is Playing At My House/Disco Infiltrator).

Musically, I’m not really a fan of noise. Or rough takes. In broadstroke sweeping terms I like pop: polished, produced things. This is why I don’t listen to much punk or indie rock, and prefer the Beatles to the Stones. But over the years LCD’s backbone/brain/multi-instrumentalist DFA guru James Murphy has smoothed out, (at least production-wise: see Someone Great or the entire 45:33 album) and with the recent This Is Happening I’m officially back on board.

For me, most relevant to this (or any) moment are the feelings evoked with the record. With a matured voice Murphy sweetly delivers the anthemic inspirational messages we party folks rely on him for—urging nightlifers to let loose, encouraging hook-ups and silliness (“People who need people to the back of the bus!”), being real about the pitfalls of partying alongside it’s capacity to save your soul.

Murphy talks a lot about intimacy and miscommunication on my two favorite tracks Home and I Can Change, referencing the need for human connection and personal growth (“No one opens up when you scream and shout.”) Maybe it’s the famed power of his hulking aggression, but Murphy has this genius way of celebrating living without seeming cloying or stilted. Each track speaks to a greater experience of living up to potential (“Forget a terrible year …love and rock are bigger things”) and even the love songs emote beyond boy-meets-girl vanilla conventions—they connote that greater kind of love, a love of people or music or the mere opportunity to feel something that huge, and the drive and inspiration to keep pushing that feeling to grow.

Blackout and I listened to album together on our drive down to Philly this weekend (to play Robotique at KFN-highly recommended), and he astutely remarked that in some ways Murphy might be the new Morrissey, because he writes about universal themes in a way we can all identify with. Maybe that’s why I’m so enamored? And thus I conclude with the following:

And love is a curse, shoved in a hearse, love is an open book to a verse of your bad poetry …and this is coming from me.”

Blog Entry: Welcome to the Party!

Loudcrowd Blog Entry by Roseanne Malfucci

When I take that inevitably damning “What am I doing with my life” self-survey, almost everything I care about — writing, DJing, record collecting, party throwing — has revolved around music. In my teens (true story!) I would often say that music was the only friend you could always count on; and while I might not be so emo on the subject now, the power of a good song to capture my mood — or transform it — remains unrivalled.

Something else about me: I can be impatient. So, as one of those women who proudly, loudly proclaims “I am never, ever birthing children!” (too messy) it seems poetic justice that I’ve waited nine months, almost popping at the seams, to deliver Loudcrowd’s music to the public now, at our launch. Not that I did it myself of course — the entire Loudcrowd team worked for countless days and nights to bring this site to life. We’re finally out, and I’m exhausted.

Our sound has a lot to be excited about: brand new tracks from Miike Snow, Datarock, and Phoenix, unreleased material and remixes from the Twelves, plus a freshly curated playlist by Steve of Soulwax. And our favorites Kid Sister, Cut Copy, Holy Ghost! and Justice are on rotation as usual.

Hope you like our new site; feel free to play until your fingers go numb—and when you regain feeling, make sure to send us some feedback on how awesome it was.

—Fucci

Blog Entry from my DJ Collective You Don’t Have To Settle

Like many, I first became aware of Pink Floyd in middle school, but college is where my fondness for the band really blossomed. I was a junior, with my first serious boyfriend, and Dark Side of the Moon was the soundtrack to our endless make-out sessions. Over ten years later I still listen to that album, and it sometimes conjures up a glimpse of those old euphoric feelings; the kind of synergistic sensory experience you get from travel, or sex, or sometimes yoga.

Countless albums have paid tribute to Pink Floyd; one of the best being a record that has been on Billboard’s reggae charts since 2003; the Easy Star All-Stars Dub Side of the Moon, which I love. (Full disclosure: I haven’t heard the full 2010 re-work Dubber Side of the Moon, though considering the bass-heavy dub remix of Money from Mad Professor, I bet it’s worth a listen.)

Then there’s the tribute album from Vitamin String Quartet—a savior band for any DJ who has done a wedding; I’ve found their take on Echoes to be quite useful. And continuing on the lighter side is Wish You Were Here from Lia Ices, originally recorded for Mojo Magazine’s Pink Floyd tribute compilation.  Ices’ cover is like the rest of her catalogue; ethereal, breathy, sort of a Feist 2.0 with traces of Kate Bush. Schooled close to home at NYU’s Tisch School, Ices is my latest neo-folk crush, and you know it’s deep because I’d never utter that term lightly.

-Fucci

picplz & charity: water team up for #worldwaterday

charity: water teams up with picplz for #worldwaterday by posting a call to action on their picplz account:



picplz supports promotion through their channels:

from bestofpicplz:

Over 1 Billion people don’t have access to clean drinking water, and yesterday people across the globe reflected on this for World Water Day.

picplz teamed up with charity: water and encouraged you to post photos that express how water plays an integral role in your life.

We have received so many great photos that we’re extending submissions for one more day.



Submissions are entered and reviewed:



The winner’s photo is posted on charity: water’s blog:


Madision Square Garden & picplz team up to give away tickets to the last LCD Soundsystem show in NYC. Users submit black and white photos to win. 

MSG and picplz promote the contest through social media posts:


Submissions are varied and creative:




Winner is selected to receive two tickets to the last show….


…and later shares shots from the show with the picplz community.

Madision Square Garden & picplz team up to give away tickets to the last LCD Soundsystem show in NYC. Users submit black and white photos to win. 



MSG and picplz promote the contest through social media posts:



Submissions are varied and creative:



Winner is selected to receive two tickets to the last show….




…and later shares shots from the show with the picplz community.


TOMS promotion on picplz: #withoutshoes

from bestofpicplz:

On April 5th TOMS Shoes is raising awareness to the millions of children in poverty around the world by asking people to go One Day Without Shoes. As you may already know, TOMS donates a pair of shoes to a child in need for every pair of TOMS shoes sold. Its their One for One mission.

We at picplz want to help TOMS in their amazing charitable efforts by urging you picplzrs to spread awareness on April 5th.

Post a black and white photo to picplz of your bare feet with the caption “#WithoutShoes”.  Don’t be afraid to get creative.

To the user who submits the most compelling and creative bare foot photo on April 5th, picplz will buy you one pair of TOMS shoes (which means a child in need gets a pair too!) and your photo will be featured on best of picplz!

Please join us in spreading awareness of this great cause.



Submissions to the #withoutshoes picplz contest:



Winning Submission:

Willie Mae Rock Camp
Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls is a non-profit music and mentoring program that empowers girls and women through music education, leadership skills, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration.
 
Every summer I volunteer, teaching a week-long DJ course to a small group of young women in this highly interactive, diverse, and experiential environment. I am always amazed to watch their innate creativity and exponentially growing skills; from the first day they are playing records, and at the end of the week they perform their own live set to a crowd of hundreds. 





Photos courtesy of Kate Englebrecht (Thriller), Kate Milford (Devil Horns), Emily August (Blue Tees)

Willie Mae Rock Camp

Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls is a non-profit music and mentoring program that empowers girls and women through music education, leadership skills, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration.

Every summer I volunteer, teaching a week-long DJ course to a small group of young women in this highly interactive, diverse, and experiential environment. I am always amazed to watch their innate creativity and exponentially growing skills; from the first day they are playing records, and at the end of the week they perform their own live set to a crowd of hundreds. 

Photos courtesy of Kate Englebrecht (Thriller), Kate Milford (Devil Horns), Emily August (Blue Tees)

Installation Review: “Preternature”

Art Installation Review by Roseanne Malfucci

Though it was just past noon on a Sunday, I was already worn out when I arrived at a meeting to discuss the cataloguing of Preternature.  It was my third stop of the day, and after wearily greeting Chase and Lenk I promptly excused myself, anxious to rinse off the residue of previous activities.

Upon entering the bathroom I’m immediately taken aback by a colony of shiny turquoise mollusks trekking from the toilet up towards the medicine cabinet. I smiled, remembering the intrigue from when I first learned of Chase’s work. A sensitizing engagement, his creatures simultaneously captivate and repulse; missing links to the hidden ecosystems all around us, drawn with animated vibrance.

Vivid pastels make Chase’s creatures somehow endearing- dissolving your disgust toward hundred-legged insects, you are whisked back to the sandbox, observing marching ants on your hands and knees. Further inquiry becomes amazement when you find that each creature has been reconstituted from our collective refuse. Carnage left in the wake of our modern routines- straws, styrofoam, gum- reduced to a pulp and transformed into the earth’s decomposers. The inert plastics that cornerstone our daily existence living their afterlife as bacteria and molds. 

With regeneration as their primary function, the surroundings of these decomposers are inextricably entwined with the forms themselves. Viewing these forms after return to their origins, we witness an extension of sprawling life energy alongside deliberate rooting to environment. Lenk’s chosen perspectives place each piece with careful subtlety, suggesting the delicate strength of the natural world.  Random tufts of grass peek up from a distant floorboard; molds creep along pipe at the base of a building. Juxtaposed with these are similar emergents, captured imprints of the course of human traffic. Framing grace and chaos through explorations of urban landscape, Lenk infuses synthetic everyday living with the wonder of a discovery walk through the woods.

Loudcrowd

Loudcrowd was Conduit Labs’ (now Zynga Boston) first game- a destination website of clubs and playlists, where users could mingle and interact within a community as they leveled up to unlock dances and abilities. Users would personalize their characters with clothing, accessories, new moves, and songs collected. Loudcrowd revolved around curated music, with daily playlists by myself and guest DJs like Eli Escobar, Brooklyn Vegan and Santigold. As Conduit’s Director of Music Programming I had the opportunity to interview A-trak, produce a video with Chester French, and work with tons of other great independent artists.

Press

Wired

Credits:

Chester French video filmed by Emily Zilm

Roseanne interviews A-trak photo by Winnie Au 

Love Machine
In 2008, me and my NRG DJ partner Brian Blackout were both single, and wanted to do something about it. Love Machine was born as a way to bring upbeat music and (available!) NYC community together in a light-hearted low-pressure way. We worked with tech guru team Publk to install an interactive chat station where party-goers could text or twitter messages to other bar patrons they’d like to get to know. We handed out numbers for guests (including the DJs) to identify themselves, and all messages-personal or anonymous- were projected on the stage.

Love Machine

In 2008, me and my NRG DJ partner Brian Blackout were both single, and wanted to do something about it. Love Machine was born as a way to bring upbeat music and (available!) NYC community together in a light-hearted low-pressure way. We worked with tech guru team Publk to install an interactive chat station where party-goers could text or twitter messages to other bar patrons they’d like to get to know. We handed out numbers for guests (including the DJs) to identify themselves, and all messages-personal or anonymous- were projected on the stage.


Double Vision
In 2007, those that found themselves in NYC Chinatown’s Happy Ending on a Wednesday night may have stumbled into the basement and wondered- who are all these weirdos? Bathed in neon, LED light and strobe, patrons at Love Muscle danced with drag queens, eco-hackers, recovering goths, and tranny tapdancers, all to a proto/post/nu/future disco soundtrack provided by Fucci. Hosts Sequinette and Glenn Marla kept the fun moving while pre-status DJs made guest appearances.
On this particular evening, the theme was Double Vision, a transmorphic party where guests were encouraged to take on their better (or worse) half. Wandering through installations like the Sequinette’s UV Reactive Bubble Lounge and Boylab’s Stereoscopic Image Station, partygoers would try on a range of personalities, with their ultimate transformations projected live on the wall.
 

Double Vision

In 2007, those that found themselves in NYC Chinatown’s Happy Ending on a Wednesday night may have stumbled into the basement and wondered- who are all these weirdos? Bathed in neon, LED light and strobe, patrons at Love Muscle danced with drag queens, eco-hackers, recovering goths, and tranny tapdancers, all to a proto/post/nu/future disco soundtrack provided by Fucci. Hosts Sequinette and Glenn Marla kept the fun moving while pre-status DJs made guest appearances.

On this particular evening, the theme was Double Vision, a transmorphic party where guests were encouraged to take on their better (or worse) half. Wandering through installations like the Sequinette’s UV Reactive Bubble Lounge and Boylab’s Stereoscopic Image Station, partygoers would try on a range of personalities, with their ultimate transformations projected live on the wall.

 

Short Story Excerpt: “Chairwork”

Essay by Roseanne Malfucci

You know the feeling.  You haven’t seen your family for a while and you’ve finally managed to make that trek to their doorstep for the first time in over a year. You reach for the bell, then thoughtfully pause and scan your appearance. This is your thirty-second window to conceal all evidence of the lack of composition in your daily life. 

Imagine going through this exercise on a continual basis. Once a week you make an entrance that sets the subtle, encoded tone for your entire visit and forms a lasting imprint on all interactions to come. You’re probably familiar with this kind of pressure. If not, you’re the only person I know who isn’t currently conducting that secret, serial relationship that dare not speak its name.

Therapy.  

Those few seconds outside the therapist’s door are reserved for self-scrutiny; the time to hide anything that might betray my less-than-together status.  My demeanor overhaul goes like this: Slow down my breathing. Clear my head. Fix my clothes and adjust my baggage.  I will enter this office with a graceful poise that masks the many issues requiring me to return for a weekly fee of $125.

Blog Entry: LCD Soundsystem

Blog Entry by Roseanne Malfucci

I was so excited when my DJ partner Brian Blackout landed us some tickets to LCD Soundsystem’s recently added fourth show at NYC’s Terminal Five. I was late in the game to realize how completely amazing the latest record was (after its release I spent a few disinterested weeks before getting around to listening to it, thanks to my underground/outsider “it’s just getting too much hype” residual self-image). Plus I had my associations- hearing them play at opening night of London’s now-defunct The Key and being turned off by their infamous decibel level, or feeling ruffled by the harsh urgency of their mid 00s disco-punky singles (Get Innocuous/Daft Punk Is Playing At My House/Disco Infiltrator).

Musically, I’m not really a fan of noise. Or rough takes. In broadstroke sweeping terms I like pop: polished, produced things. This is why I don’t listen to much punk or indie rock, and prefer the Beatles to the Stones. But over the years LCD’s backbone/brain/multi-instrumentalist DFA guru James Murphy has smoothed out, (at least production-wise: see Someone Great or the entire 45:33 album) and with the recent This Is Happening I’m officially back on board.

For me, most relevant to this (or any) moment are the feelings evoked with the record. With a matured voice Murphy sweetly delivers the anthemic inspirational messages we party folks rely on him for—urging nightlifers to let loose, encouraging hook-ups and silliness (“People who need people to the back of the bus!”), being real about the pitfalls of partying alongside it’s capacity to save your soul.

Murphy talks a lot about intimacy and miscommunication on my two favorite tracks Home and I Can Change, referencing the need for human connection and personal growth (“No one opens up when you scream and shout.”) Maybe it’s the famed power of his hulking aggression, but Murphy has this genius way of celebrating living without seeming cloying or stilted. Each track speaks to a greater experience of living up to potential (“Forget a terrible year …love and rock are bigger things”) and even the love songs emote beyond boy-meets-girl vanilla conventions—they connote that greater kind of love, a love of people or music or the mere opportunity to feel something that huge, and the drive and inspiration to keep pushing that feeling to grow.

Blackout and I listened to album together on our drive down to Philly this weekend (to play Robotique at KFN-highly recommended), and he astutely remarked that in some ways Murphy might be the new Morrissey, because he writes about universal themes in a way we can all identify with. Maybe that’s why I’m so enamored? And thus I conclude with the following:

And love is a curse, shoved in a hearse, love is an open book to a verse of your bad poetry …and this is coming from me.”

Blog Entry: Welcome to the Party!

Loudcrowd Blog Entry by Roseanne Malfucci

When I take that inevitably damning “What am I doing with my life” self-survey, almost everything I care about — writing, DJing, record collecting, party throwing — has revolved around music. In my teens (true story!) I would often say that music was the only friend you could always count on; and while I might not be so emo on the subject now, the power of a good song to capture my mood — or transform it — remains unrivalled.

Something else about me: I can be impatient. So, as one of those women who proudly, loudly proclaims “I am never, ever birthing children!” (too messy) it seems poetic justice that I’ve waited nine months, almost popping at the seams, to deliver Loudcrowd’s music to the public now, at our launch. Not that I did it myself of course — the entire Loudcrowd team worked for countless days and nights to bring this site to life. We’re finally out, and I’m exhausted.

Our sound has a lot to be excited about: brand new tracks from Miike Snow, Datarock, and Phoenix, unreleased material and remixes from the Twelves, plus a freshly curated playlist by Steve of Soulwax. And our favorites Kid Sister, Cut Copy, Holy Ghost! and Justice are on rotation as usual.

Hope you like our new site; feel free to play until your fingers go numb—and when you regain feeling, make sure to send us some feedback on how awesome it was.

—Fucci

Installation Review: “Preternature”
Short Story Excerpt: “Chairwork”
Blog Entry: LCD Soundsystem
Blog Entry: Welcome to the Party!

About:

I'm Roseanne Malfucci. I'm an Interactive Producer and Social Experience Strategist who helps visionary web companies understand, broaden and engage their community. I'm also a writer, DJ, and envelope-pusher.

An impassioned team builder and team player, I lead cross-functional teams from ideation to delivery, creating innovative social experiences with measurable results. An ambitious and effective communicator, I am committed to using my powers for good.

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